The Best Way to Attach Dog Tags

I believe that all dogs should wear a collar with tags all day, everyday for life. Most people know this but many seem to miss the importance. They often think their dog only needs tags when they go out into the world. When they are home, some take the collar (which the tags are fastened to) off.  For anyone reading this who either has Houdini for a dog (escapes whenever he can) or who has ever had a dog that got out (yes, even one time counts) knows that tags are a must! Dogs can and do get out of the house or yard accidentally - and when this happens, tags are needed more than ever. 

Some of you are saying, "But my dog is microchipped...."

Even if your dog is microchipped it is still vital to have tags. The person who finds him will have to take him to a vet or shelter to have the dog they just picked up scanned for a chip. This could mean waiting until morning or even a couple of days until the facility is open or until the family has time to make this extra trip. All-the-while your dog may have only been down the block and a simple phone call or walk down to your house would have solved everything. And, you didn't have to get a restless night's sleep wondering where your dog is.

Another cool trick is attaching the tags to the buckle rather than the leash attachment ring. (see photo) This avoids the leash being attached to the tag ring which is very weak and will break with the slightest pull. I can't tell you how many times I've seen this happen. Most of the time it just means picking up the tags and reattaching the leash, minimal hassle. Other times it happens in grass or bushes and the tags can't be found, slightly bigger hassle. But what if it happens with a stranger who has taken your dog to a strange place and the dog then runs away from them not knowing where he is? Huge problem! So keep those tags on at all times and attach them to the buckle as an extra precaution. 

-Chad

Chad Culp–Certified Dog Trainer, Behavior Consultant, Certified Holistic Chef for Animals

Copyright 2005-2013 Chad Culp, Thriving Canine. All rights reserved. Chad@ThrivingCanine.com